A Theory of Joint-Stock Citizenship and its Consequences on the Brain Drain, Sovereignty, and State Responsibility

Authors

  • Raul Magni-Berton Sciences Po Grenoble

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.23941/ejpe.v12i2.361

Abstract

Recent discussions about global justice have focused on arguments that favor the inclusion of political and social rights within the set of human rights. By doing so, these discussions raise the issue of the existence of specific rights enjoyed exclusively by citizens of a given community. This article deals with the problem of distinguishing between human and citizen rights. Specifically, it proposes a new concept of citizen rights that is based on what I call ‘the stockholder principle’: a principle of solidarity that holds within a specific country. This concept, the paper goes on to argue, is compatible with a broad idea of human rights defined by international law and enforced according to territorial authority. The stockholder principle is further compatible with the psychological concept of citizenship based on a specific collective identity and it leads to fair consequences at the domestic and global levels.

Author Biography

Raul Magni-Berton, Sciences Po Grenoble

Raul Magni-Berton is a professor of political science at Grenoble University, Institute of Political Studies. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Paris IV-Sorbonne. Then he worked at the Universities of Montreal and Bordeaux. He works on the impact of individual rights and democratic institutions on opinions, behaviors and social justice.

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Published

2020-02-17

How to Cite

Magni-Berton, R. (2020). A Theory of Joint-Stock Citizenship and its Consequences on the Brain Drain, Sovereignty, and State Responsibility. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics, 12(2), 1–23. https://doi.org/10.23941/ejpe.v12i2.361